September 30, 2012

SUGARFIEND by Caroline Burau

Sugarfiend by Caroline Burau
Paperback & Kindle, 286 pages
Published February 11, 2012 by DragonStone Creative Group
ISBN10: 0615595200                      
ISBN13: 978-0615595207
 
If her life is a box of chocolates, acid-tongued, sugar-obsessed Estelle Brown should learn how to pick them better.
 
Her boyfriend’s left her for a bulimic hand model, her roomate’s skipped town, and her boss is in love with her.
 
Fed up and in the middle of her latest of a lifetime of doomed diet attempts – cutting sugar cold turkey – Estelle decides to quit quitting for good, pack her bags, and lose herself on a 7-day Caribbean cruise.  But even on a floating monument to binge eating, the diet industry follows her.
 
Across from every buffet is a studio full of treadmills. Next to every plate of fried calamari is a large diet Coke. As a ship full of wary passengers ducks for cover, Hurricane Estelle wages her own personal war against moderation. But the consequences land her in the belly of the beast: broke, alone, and forced to take a job as –of all things-- a detox consultant for the ship.
 
Is Skinny the answer to Happy? Is Sweet n Low the new black? Is that Denise Austin chick … for real? No, no and yes, oddly. But for a Sugarfiend, it’s not the destination that matters, it’s all the cupcakes you get to eat along the way.
 
My Thoughts on Sugarfiend
 
Caroline Burau is a terrific storyteller.  And she has a wry and witty sense of humor to which I can adoringly relate.  Sugarfiend is a testament to this.  It's not often that your book's heroine is an addictive (sugar, alcohol, drugs, men, self-loathing, you name it) personality with serious self-esteem issues and a hardcore self-destruct button . . . and yet you still like her, relate to her and root for her.
 
In the hands of a less capable, and funny as hell, writer, Estelle Brown could be the iceberg that sinks the Titanic.  Let's face it.  Some people can't relate to an alcoholic or drug addict, nor do they want to.  Some readers want more to their heroine than a woman who is merely looking for the next tray of brownies or drunken stupor.  But even in Estelle's darkest moments - - and there are quite a few - - she is so vulnerable, raw and real that you can't help but take this journey with her and hope that she sees the light.  And you don't have to be an addict to get it.  If you're a Type A personality (as I can be about certain things at certain times), it will make perfect sense to you. 
 
Despite the somewhat heavy premise of addiction, I laughed throughout a large portion of this book.  Estelle's self-depreciation gave the story a much needed comic relief.  The time she spent on the cruise ship as an employee was the best part of the tale, in my opinion.  I loved it and was disappointed when it ended. 
 
Sugarfiend has a massive cast of supporting players, for the good and for the bad.  Some quickly moved in and then out of the story, not much more than cameo appearances.  Others had larger parts  but were rather underdeveloped.  The characters of Rhonda and Roxanne, in particular, left me a bit confused.  I guess I was looking for their motivations, since Estelle's were so clear to me. 
 
I also found Sugarfiend to be a bit overwhelming at times.  That's not to say it wasn't a good read but so much went on at certain times that I was left exhausted and likely feeling the way that friends and family of addicts do when dealing with someone like Estelle.   I also felt the pride and joy of Estelle seeing the light, as Ms. Burau excelled at giving Estelle redemption. 
 
I would recommend Sugarfiend to a reader looking for an honest book with a flawed yet witty central character and a moral that isn't the proverbial two by four.  There are sex scenes and there is adult language so if you prefer your books G or PG rated, this may not be the book for you.  If you don't mind, Sugarfiend is worth the high. 
 
Sugarfiend is available for purchase at major booksellers, including Amazon.  I am an Amazon affiliate. If you make a purchase through my link, I will receive a small commission.

Review copy of this book provided by the author in exchange for a fair and honest review. In no way did the provision of this book affect the outcome of my review.

Thank you to CLP Book Tours for including me on this tour!

To connect with Caroline Burau, please visit her website
 
Please visit CLP's tour page for Caroline Burau to follow this tour.
 
 

September 29, 2012

Interview with Caroline Burau and an Excerpt from SUGARFIEND

Today I am happy to welcome Caroline Burau, author of Answering 911 and Sugarfiend, to Psychotic State Book Reviews.  Welcome, Caroline!

I’ve just read Sugarfiend and laughed all the way through.  What led you to the idea?

CB:  The idea to write Sugarfiend came mostly from my own ups and downs with dieting, food and weight issues. As I started developing the story, I realized it was also a great platform from which to throw eggs at the diet industry, which gave me all the fuel I needed to finish it.

How much of yourself did you write into the character of Estelle? 
CB:  Estelle is based on me in my twenties, but crazier, and with a higher credit limit. Other characters in the book are based on real people, but only very loosely, and most of those people are still talking to me, which is fortunate. I keep trying to tell my mom I didn't do even half the things Estelle does in Sugarfiend, but she still won't finish the last half.

As you self-published Sugarfiend, would you care to share with us your decision to do so and your experience with self-publishing?

CB:  Sugarfiend is my only self-published book. My memoir, Answering 911, was published by Borealis Books in 2006. I chose to self-publish Sugarfiend because I know that novels are much harder to place than non-fiction. It felt good to stop chasing agents and just take matters into my own hands, but self-publishing is a lot of work if you want to see results. I'm learning as I go.
You have also written a memoir (Answering 911).  Do you prefer writing fiction or non-fiction?
CB:  I don't have a preference between writing fiction and non-fiction, but I am definitely leaning toward non-fiction for my next project because I like variety. And when I'm done with that, I'll probably be thinking about another novel. Honestly, the book ideas never end. It's so annoying.

Did you always want to be a writer?

CB:   I've always just been a writer whether I've wanted to be one or not. Writing used to get me in trouble during science class in high school. Teachers frequently gave me in-school suspension, which was funny, since that just took me out of my regular class, giving me more time to write. 

I once tried writing for a living (as a reporter) and didn't really enjoy it. When writing became how I paid my bills, it became a chore. I prefer to think of writing more as a bad habit that I just don't intend to give up, like ... say ... making cookies just so I can eat the dough.

What do you consider the best part of being a writer?  The worst part?
CB:  The best part of being a writer is creating something that someone relates to, then hearing from that someone. Writers are generally kind of lonely and socially handicapped. One good compliment can have us floating for weeks.


The worst part of being a writer is that we are generally lonely and socially handicapped. Also, the pay is terrible, unless you're J.K. Rowling, or that 50 Shades person whose name shall not be mentioned. Oh, the humanity.  

What is the single best piece of advice you think an aspiring writer should hear?

CB:  Every aspiring writer should be advised that it is a terrible way to make a living, but none of them ever seem to listen.

And a few random questions . . .

If I was a dessert I would be . . . Anything that looks really sweet, but will break your tooth if you're not careful. Peanut brittle, maybe? Chocolate-covered agates?

The strangest item on my desk is . . .  a pair of platform ruby red Dorothy shoes. Super uncomfortable.

If I could switch places with any person for one day it would be . . . my cat. I know that's not a person, but I just really want to sleep for 21 hours straight.

The book currently on my nightstand is . . .  The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo  

If I had a Super Power it would be . . .   "Super-Procrastinator!"

Why should readers buy your books?
CB:  Because they are not about vampires, bondage, or vampire bondage.

Lastly, what one word would you say best describes Sugarfiend? 
CB:  Shiny!
 
Thank you, Caroline for taking the time to chat with me and my readers.  Best of luck with Sugarfiend!  (And I'm dying to know more about your Dorothy ruby red slippers!)

Readers, be sure to check back tomorrow for my review of Sugarfiend.

And let's take a poll . . . if YOU could change places with any one person for the day, who would it be and why? 

Me, I would change places with Jane Austen, back when she was alive and writing of course.  I would love to have twenty-four hours of insight into her mind, her wit and humor and know once and for all - - where she got her ideas and if Mr. Darcy was based on an actual person!

EXCERPT FROM SUGARFIEND

January something, somewhere in the Caribbean.
It’s karaoke night here on the SS Sugar Shock and I’m absolutely killing. I’m a star, a queen! A legend in my own mind.
 
Loretta Lynn never struck me as someone who would know exactly how many calories there are in one M&M; (seven the in plain, twelve or so in the peanut), but if this song I’m singing at top volume is any indication, the woman does know heartbreak. Heartbreak and lyin’ and cheatin’. Therefore, I could absolutely be wrong about the M&Ms.
 
I’ve been wrong before.
 
Like when I thought James was something more than just a thirteenth-stepping chubby-chaser. Or like when I thought Bill was worthy of even touching the hem of my size-14 potato sack. Or like when I thought I could ever, for even one minute, abstain from sugar without eventually going batshit crazy.
 
As I round the corner from the verse to the chorus, I try to get a read on my audience. Suddenly, I experience one of those moments where one’s initial feeling of triumph gives way to the possibility that I actually have toilet paper stuck to my shoe or asparagus in my teeth, if I ever ate asparagus. Or that everyone in this place is completely on to the fact that I am in the middle of batshit crazy.
 
Women like you are a dime a dozen, you can buy ‘em anywhere.
For you to get to him, I’d have to move over, and I’m gonna stand right here.
 
The waitress with the pretzel-stick thighs looks pensive. My twin bunkmates Rhonda and Roxanne look bored and worried, respectively. But, that’s how they always look. There’s nothing much to read in Rhonda’s face that couldn’t be found in ten minutes of any given episode of The Jersey Shore, but Roxanne’s face is really saying something. It’s saying, I think, that this journey I’m on was doomed from the start. It’s saying that whatever I boarded this ship to do I’ve long since overdone and that what’s needed now is a little restraint. What’s needed here is better judgment. Moderation, for crying out loud!

But I don’t do moderation. I’m an all-or-nothing girl.

September 12, 2012

Changes Coming!


I've decided it's time to overhaul my site and Lori with Imagination Designs is working with me to bring my vision to light.  See a portfolio of Lori's designs here.

I need your opinions!  Right now my site has more of a classic 1930s Hollywood theme - - which I love - - but it doesn't necessarily go with the name Psychotic State.  I'd like something that is more cohesive with my name, while still linking up with the types of books I typically read and review.  Therein lies the problem.  I have a very eclectic library and taste in books.  I read a lot of Jane Austen variations, mysteries, thrillers, historical fiction and chick lit with some true crime thrown in.  See my dilemma? 

I am debating taking the site in a more Victorian gothic way but without being dark.  No goth whatsoever.  I don't want anyone to think I only read and review "dark" books.  Think Victorian gaslamps, London street scene, fog, clocks . . . but in a whimsical way.  If you click on Lori's portfolio above, see "Scribble City Central" or "Starting the Next Chapter" for examples.

On the other side, I have considered having a girl across the header (supposed to be me, I guess!) that is "locked up" by books in some way.  My uncle suggested an asylum theme, given my site name and while I don't want to have an actual asylum, maybe having someone surrounded by books or "locked up" by books.   Obviously this theme would be lighter and brighter and maybe not so genre specific.  See "Coffee Books & Me" in Lori's portfolio as an example. 

This is where I need your help.  Any and all opinions are welcome.  Let me know what you think of my two suggestions.  Which do you like?  If you don't care for either, please say.  If you have a better idea, please share.  Any suggestions I use, I will gratefully give a shoutout to you on my reveal day. 

Thank you so much - - and please comment with those opinions.

September 5, 2012

A WILDERNESS OF ERROR: THE TRIALS OF JEFFREY MACDONALD by Errol Morris

A Wilderness of Error:  The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald by Errol Morris
Hardcover, 544 pages
Published September 4, 2012 by Penguin Press HC
ISBN: 1594203431                     
ISBN13: 9781594203435
 
Academy Award-winning filmmaker and former private detective Errol Morris examines the nature of evidence and proof in the infamous Jeffrey MacDonald murder case

Early on the morning of February 17, 1970, in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Jeffrey MacDonald, a Green Beret doctor, called the police for help. When the officers arrived at his home they found the bloody and battered bodies of MacDonald’s pregnant wife and two young daughters. The word “pig” was written in blood on the headboard in the master bedroom. As MacDonald was being loaded into the ambulance, he accused a band of drug-crazed hippies of the crime.

So began one of the most notorious and mysterious murder cases of the twentieth century. Jeffrey MacDonald was finally convicted in 1979 and remains in prison today. Since then a number of bestselling books—including Joe McGinniss’s Fatal Vision and Janet Malcolm’s The Journalist and the Murderer—and a blockbuster television miniseries have told their versions of the MacDonald case and what it all means.

Errol Morris has been investigating the MacDonald case for over twenty years. A Wilderness of Error is the culmination of his efforts. It is a shocking book, because it shows us that almost everything we have been told about the case is deeply unreliable, and crucial elements of the case against MacDonald simply are not true. It is a masterful reinvention of the true-crime thriller, a book that pierces the haze of myth surrounding these murders with the sort of brilliant light that can only be produced by years of dogged and careful investigation and hard, lucid thinking.

By this book’s end, we know several things: that there are two very different narratives we can create about what happened at 544 Castle Drive, and that the one that led to the conviction and imprisonment for life of this man for butchering his wife and two young daughters is almost certainly wrong. Along the way Morris poses bracing questions about the nature of proof, criminal justice, and the media, showing us how MacDonald has been condemned, not only to prison, but to the stories that have been created around him.

In this profoundly original meditation on truth and justice, Errol Morris reopens one of America’s most famous cases and forces us to confront the unimaginable. Morris has spent his career unsettling our complacent assumptions that we know what we’re looking at, that the stories we tell ourselves are true. This book is his finest and most important achievement to date.

My Thoughts on A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald

Since 1985, I have had a long, twisting journey with the Jeffrey MacDonald case.  It started with Fatal Vision, the miniseries, and progressed to Fatal Vision, the book about the case penned by Joe McGinniss.  I followed those over time with The Journalist and the Murderer by Janet Malcolm, Fatal Justice by Jerry Allen Potter and Fred Bost and Scales of Justice by Christina Masewicz.  I visited various websites and read anything I could find about the case.  Throughout the years my views on the case changed dramatically.  I penned my changing thoughts here.  In short, I believed MacDonald was guilty but something was off with the case, then there was a great chance that MacDonald was innocent and wrongly imprisoned and, finally, that MacDonald was guilty of the horrible crimes he was convicted of.  

When I heard that filmmaker Errol Morris (he of the documentary The Thin Blue Line, which helped to free Randall Dale Adams, wrongly convicted of the murder of a Dallas police officer) had written a book in which he takes on the government's case against MacDonald, I knew that I had to read it.

I will admit that I went into this book deadset on MacDonald's guilt and mentally telling myself that no matter what Mr. Morris wrote in his book, I simply couldn't believe that MacDonald was anything less than guilty.  Perhaps not exactly fair to Mr. Morris but given that the murders happened in 1970, MacDonald was convicted in 1979 and so much has been written about the case, both for and against MacDonald, it's not surprising. 

If you are not well read or versed on the MacDonald case, A Wilderness of Error is probably not the place to start.  Not because it's not well written - - because it is and Mr. Morris does a fine job of supporting his statements.  But the book reads for someone already familiar with the background of the murders and the lengthy process in which MacDonald was brought to justice as the background of the crimes themselves is not nearly in-depth as the follow-up.

Mr. Morris excels at bringing to life Helena Stoeckley, the young hippie girl bearing a remarkable resemblance to one of the intruders MacDonald described to the military police following the murders, and who was to be the smoking gun for the defense during the 1979 trial.  As Ms. Stoeckley herself was deceased by the time Mr. Morris began research for his book, he did interview family members, neighbors and people who knew and associated with her.  She is presented both as a police informant living in Fayetteville's Haymount neighborhood (and hippie district), who partook in drugs and witchcraft and the sad, depleted woman MacDonald and his attorneys hung their hopes on.

Mr. Morris also shone a bright and unforgiving light on Colette MacDonald's mother and stepfather Mildred and Freddy Kassab.  The Kassabs were presented in McGinniss' Fatal Vision as the martyred and heartsick family members who made it their life mission to bring their daughter's and granddaughters' killer to justice.  Freddy Kassab, in particular, was the tenacious bulldog who grabbed ahold of Jeffrey MacDonald and wouldn't let go, joining forces with the government's prosecutors to see that his former son-in-law had his freedom taken away.  The information that Mr. Morris outlined in his book, and supported by long-time friends of the family, is vastly different than the majority of what I have read and it did give me pause. 

Mr. Morris didn't appear to have a lot of communications with MacDonald himself and that, to me, is a shortcoming with the book.  What small amount of communication he did have was saved for the conclusion of the book.  He is honest in his presentation - - that MacDonald is unlikable, annoying and quite full of himself but a good doctor and some of his off-putting qualities make him a good surgeon. 

Perhaps Mr. Morris' strongest argument for MacDonald lies within the weakness of the government's supposed shoe-in evidence.  He takes on their pajama top experiment and invalidates their results, as well as their assertion that saran hair fibers found in a hairbrush at the crime scene were not those of one of the MacDonald children's dolls but had come from a wig.  Helena Stoeckley owned a wig of the same color as those hairs found and during one of her confessions, claimed to be wearing that wig at the time of the crimes.  

Despite my assertions that I would not be moved by Mr. Morris' writing, I was.  He made a clear and concise argument that Jeffrey MacDonald did not receive a fair trial - - from Judge Dupree's relationship with the original prosecutor (his son-in-law) to inaccurate government tests that were presented as gospel to threats of prosecution given to Helena Stoeckley should she testify to being present at the crime scene and vouching for MacDonald's innocence - - and there was no shortage of reasonable doubt. 

A Wilderness of Error did not change my stance on MacDonald guilt or innocence, however well written it was.  And here is why.  I can throw out all the evidence - - the blood evidence, the pajama top, the bedsheets, the fibers, Helena Stoeckley's confessions and recanting of same . . . but what gets me is the difference between MacDonald's injuries and those inflicted on his family.  If a group of drug addicted hippies wanted to get even with MacDonald for ratting them out or not giving them drugs or whatever their reasoning may have been, wouldn't they have taken the largest threat - - MacDonald - - and eliminated him first?  Why attack a pregnant woman and two little girls - - a 5 year old and a 2 year old - - before even addressing MacDonald?  Why crush the skulls of a woman and a 5 year old and leave MacDonald with one bruise on his head?  A bruise with no broken skin?  Why would MacDonald have one clean cut to his chest when his wife and children suffered many?  One daughter had over thirty stab wounds.  Does it make sense to massacre two children who could never identify one intruder and leave behind the one person who could? 

None of that makes sense to me and taking that into consideration, I can't believe MacDonald's story about hippie intruders.  What I can believe though is that he didn't get a fair trial and guilty or innocent, everyone deserves a fair trial.  So while I think he's guilty, he was wrongfully convicted and that's just not right. 

For those of you out there that have a similar obsession with the MacDonald case, I would not hesitate to recommend A Wilderness of Error.  If you appreciate true crime and are unfamiliar with the case,  I would suggest some background research through one of the handful of sites devoted to the case on the Internet or reading Fatal Vision, Fatal Journey or Scales of Justice.  (The Journalist and the Murderer is about Joe McGinniss' role in his relationship with MacDonald and resulting lawsuit and not about the case itself). 

Very well done, Mr. Morris.  You presented us with a well-written, thought provoking book and one that may expose the many missteps of the government to the public.

A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald is available for purchase at major booksellers, including Amazon.  I am an Amazon affiliate. If you make a purchase through my link, I will receive a small commission.

Review copy of this book provided by the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. In no way did the provision of this book affect the outcome of my review.

Thank you to TLC Book Tours for including me on this tour!

For more information on author Errol Morris, please visit his website or Twitter.

 
 


September 4, 2012

New Release Tuesday

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Happy Release Day!


Murder Most Austen:  A Mystery by Tracy Kiely
Hardcover, 304 pages
Expected publication: September 4th 2012 by Minotaur Books
 
A dedicated Anglophile and Janeite, Elizabeth Parker is hoping the trip to the annual Jane Austen Festival in Bath will distract her from her lack of a job and her uncertain future with her boyfriend, Peter.

On the plane ride to England, she and Aunt Winnie meet Professor Richard Baines, a self-proclaimed expert on all things Austen. His outlandish claims that within each Austen novel there is a sordid secondary story is second only to his odious theory on the true cause of Austen’s death. When Baines is found stabbed to death in his Mr. Darcy costume during the costume ball, it appears that Baines’s theories have finally pushed one Austen fan too far. But Aunt Winnie’s friend becomes the prime suspect, so Aunt Winnie enlists Elizabeth to find the professor’s real killer. With an ex-wife, a scheming daughter-in-law, and a trophy wife, not to mention a festival’s worth of die-hard Austen fans, there are no shortage of suspects.

This fourth in Tracy Kiely’s charming series is pure delight. If Bath is the number-one Mecca for Jane Austen fans, Murder Most Austen is the perfect read for those who love some laughs and quick wit with their mystery. 
 
A Wilderness of Error:  The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald by Errol Morris

Hardcover, 544 pages
Published August 28th 2012 by Penguin Press HC

Academy Award-winning filmmaker and former private detective Errol Morris examines the nature of evidence and proof in the infamous Jeffrey MacDonald murder case.
Early on the morning of February 17, 1970, in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Jeffrey MacDonald, a Green Beret doctor, called the police for help. When the officers arrived at his home they found the bloody and battered bodies of MacDonald’s pregnant wife and two young daughters. The word “pig” was written in blood on the headboard in the master bedroom. As MacDonald was being loaded into the ambulance, he accused a band of drug-crazed hippies of the crime.

So began one of the most notorious and mysterious murder cases of the twentieth century. Jeffrey MacDonald was finally convicted in 1979 and remains in prison today. Since then a number of bestselling books—including Joe McGinniss’s Fatal Vision and Janet Malcolm’s The Journalist and the Murderer—and a blockbuster television miniseries have told their versions of the MacDonald case and what it all means.

Errol Morris has been investigating the MacDonald case for over twenty years. A Wilderness of Error is the culmination of his efforts. It is a shocking book, because it shows us that almost everything we have been told about the case is deeply unreliable, and crucial elements of the case against MacDonald simply are not true. It is a masterful reinvention of the true-crime thriller, a book that pierces the haze of myth surrounding these murders with the sort of brilliant light that can only be produced by years of dogged and careful investigation and hard, lucid thinking.

By this book’s end, we know several things: that there are two very different narratives we can create about what happened at 544 Castle Drive, and that the one that led to the conviction and imprisonment for life of this man for butchering his wife and two young daughters is almost certainly wrong. Along the way Morris poses bracing questions about the nature of proof, criminal justice, and the media, showing us how MacDonald has been condemned, not only to prison, but to the stories that have been created around him.

In this profoundly original meditation on truth and justice, Errol Morris reopens one of America’s most famous cases and forces us to confront the unimaginable. Morris has spent his career unsettling our complacent assumptions that we know what we’re looking at, that the stories we tell ourselves are true. This book is his finest and most important achievement to date.
 
 
 
Caught (The Missing #5) by Margaret Peterson Haddix

Hardcover, 352 pages
Expected publication: September 4th 2012 by Simon & Schuster
 
Jonah and Katherine come face to face with Albert Einstein in the fifth book of the New York Times bestselling The Missing series.  Jonah and Katherine are accustomed to traveling through time, but when learn they next have to return Albert Einstein’s daughter to history, they think it’s a joke—they’ve only heard of his sons. But it turns out that Albert Einstein really did have a daughter, Lieserl, whose 1902 birth and subsequent disappearance was shrouded in mystery. Lieserl was presumed to have died of scarlet fever as an infant. But when Jonah and Katherine return to the early 1900s to fix history, one of Lieserl’s parents seems to understand entirely too much about time travel and what Jonah and Katherine are doing. It’s not Lieserl’s father, either—it’s her mother, Mileva. And Mileva has no intention of letting her daughter disappear.

September 3, 2012

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?



Welcome to It’s Monday! What Are You Reading! This is a great way to plan out your reading week and see what others are currently reading as well… you never know where that next “must read” book will come from!

This fun meme is hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

I had an extremely stressful and busy week, which affected my book reading.  This is what I finished last week:


A Wilderness of Error:  The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald by Errol Morris, for blog tour and review at TLC
Hardcover, 544 pages
Published September 4, 2012 by Penguin Press HC
ISBN 1594203431 (ISBN13: 9781594203435)        
This is what I started and am reading now:


The Cutting Season by Attica Locke, for blog tour and review at TLC
Hardcover, 384 pages
Expected publication: September 18th 2012 by Harper
ISBN:  0061802050  (ISBN13: 9780061802058)
This is what I am listening to in the car:


11/22/63 by Stephen King, picked up from Audible.com
Audio CD, Unabridged, 31 pages
Published November 8th 2011 by Simon & Schuster Audio (first published January 1st 2011)
ISBN 1442344288 (ISBN13: 9781442344280)             
This is what I plan on starting this week: 



Willow Pond by Carol Tibaldi, for blog tour and review at Pump Up Your Book
Paperback
Published December 12th 2011 by Carol Tibaldi
ISBN13:  9781468111729        
 
 
 
Sugarfiend by Caroline Burau, for blog tour and review at  CLP Blog Tours
Paperback, 286 pages
Published February 11th 2012 by DragonStone Creative Group
ISBN 0615595200 (ISBN13: 9780615595207)


Please watch for my review of A Wilderness of Error:  The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald on Wednesday!

What are you reading?